Wonder Woman Is …

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Enduring DC’s lackadaisical treatment of the first lady of comics has been something of a challenge for me critically, and if I am being completely honest, emotionally as well. When I get all fired up, I say things like, DC Ruined Wonder Woman Twice in One Day. Sure, it’s alarmist… only in the sense that I was genuinely alarmed. I pissed a few folks off with that write-up.

It is true that I rather enjoy raising the fanboy cackle, but I did read some of the criticisms of my rant. One thing stood out as fair – I had not read Superman/Wonder Woman. While I was only commenting on the strangeness and absurdity of a variant cover, I figure if I am going to continue to malign DC’s current treatment of the character – I could consider more than just Azzarello’s run. (Again, if I am being completely honest, two of my best good friends also told me I might like. It did take two of them.)

I have now read all seven issues of Superman/Wonder Woman, and I liked it. Mostly. Continue reading

All Roads Lead to Shutter: An Interview with Joe Keatinge

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Joe Keatinge’s star might still be rising, but his place in the industry was secured after the launch of his acclaimed run on Glory in 2012. Since then, books like Hell Yeah, DC Comics Presents, Morbius: The Living Vampire, and Marvel Knights: Hulk have (relative merits aside) served as stepping stones to Keatinge and artist Leila del Duca’s newest creator-owned series, Shutter.

Joe kindly took some time to chat with me about life, comics, and his new book. There was also some wine and a sandwich, which have been edited for your reading pleasure. Continue reading

Wonder Woman Is …

With Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang officially departing the Wonder Woman book this summer, our favorite Amazon is ripe for reassessment and, one can always hope, redemption. According to Bleeding Cool, Meredith and David Finch will take over writing and illustrator duties respectively.

Of all the issues G3 has had with the current run, Chiang’s exceptional art wasn’t one of them. Given the many conversations that have taken place about how female comics characters are drawn (See: The Hawkeye Initiative), the fact that DC is putting its marquee superheroine in the hands of an artist whose style skews cheesecake is a letdown but, at this point, not surprising. Having never read any of Meredith Finch’s work, I am keeping an open mind. Simply making the stories about the title character would be an improvement.

After V. and I reached our individual breaking points with the current state of Wonder Woman, we started talking about the times when creative teams got Diana absolutely right. In the spirit of being constructive, we decided to share some shining moments that captured the Amazon princess as she should be. Continue reading

WTF? Wednesday: Girl Gone Wild

As every smart parent knows, the best way to keep kids from becoming sexually active is to treat their feelings as something dirty, destructive and unmentionable. This is particularly true when you are raising daughters, because society does not go far enough in enforcing a double standard for males and females. Girls, nothing is more important than maintaining a good reputation! Take it from “First Kiss,” the cautionary tale from Falling In Love #118:

Your first boyfriend … Your first date … And your first kiss! And suddenly that one kiss leads to another and another and another … until you finally have to ask yourself: “Am I still worthy of love?” Continue reading

On Marvel’s All-Girl X-Men

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X-Men #1 by Terry Dodson

The all-female X-Men started off full of promise. The first issue had a solid premise and was graced with Olivier Coipel’s stellar lines. The first arc laid the groundwork for a variety of female characterizations we rarely get to see in superhero comics like single-motherhood and alpha-female postulating.   Continue reading

WTF? Wednesday: ‘Full Hands, Empty Heart’

Young Romance #194 (DC Comics, 1973) totally ruined my usual ritual of finding a histrionic romance comic story and mocking it from start to finish. Not that “Full Hands, Empty Heart,” the story about the thwarted love of an African-American nurse and a white doctor, doesn’t have its ridiculous parts. However, I found myself having sincere feelings after reading it. That’s not how WTF? Wednesday is supposed to work! Continue reading

Link

Yesterday at the comic shop, I grabbed a peek at Deadly Class #1 because I knew it was Remender’s new book. As you know, I am a follow-the-writer kind of fangirl. A quick perusal of the pages struck me with some fantastic art.

Sold.

For more on Deadly Class #1, check Lindsey’s full review right HERE.

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G3 Year in Review: Honorable Mention

It was a tough task to make a list of the “BEST” comics for 2013 because inevitably some books have to get left off. Some really great books.

What does one do?

She makes another list.

Sometimes they were flubbed by crossover confusion. Sometimes Grant Morrison didn’t make any sense, again. Sometimes the writer got caught up in a sexual harassment scandal. But no matter what the obstacle, these titles still managed tear-jerking, character-defining, cuteness-overloaded, chaotically magic moments.  Here are their honorable mentions. Continue reading

G3 Year in Review: Best of the Best

After you have read comics for awhile, the lines start to blur and the colors bleed together (this is particularly true for superhero comics). Like TV and film, comics often lean on money-making cliche and character tropes, but there are always the books that are brave enough to do their own thing.

It is those books that rise to the surface with wonderful moments of originality, great creative spirit and often the fanfare that they deserve (like making G3′s “You Should Be Reading” list).

The following comics are the crème de la crème, an example for other comics to follow and collectively, the ladies of G3 pull them all. Get the issues. Get the trades. Get the hardcovers. These are the books that are worth every red cent and your precious leisure time. Promise. Continue reading

2014 Comic Book Resolutions

Row of comicsIn the final weeks of 2013, I finally got real with my pull list. I’d been on autopilot for a long time, continuing to buy comics I wasn’t dying to read and letting them pile up. Fear of being out of the loop or abandoning beloved characters was holding me back, but I finally found the gumption to make big changes. I’m looking forward to a fresh start this year.

In the spirit of the new year, we came up with some advice to guide you to happier reading in 2014. Continue reading

DC Ruins Wonder Woman, Twice in One Day

The women of G3 stopped buying Wonder Woman months ago. But on occasion, I still read the issues in order to review them. Today, I read Wonder Woman #25 for that very reason (review forthcoming).

EDIT: Here’s that review.

***SPOILER WARNING***

The issue opens with Zola, Hera and Diana having coffee talk. In a flagrant “Fuck you!” to the Bechdel Test; first they compare notes about Hermes spying on them, then they expound upon how Apollo affected Hera and then Orion shows up to “save them” from Hermes’ watchful eye. The pixie-dream Strife punctuates the family gathering with an obvious attempt at subversion. Strife doing what Strife does, gives Diana a gift. It’s the helmet of the recently deceased Ares and we are presented with this gem of a panel … Continue reading

WTF? Wednesday: Miss Peeping Tom

Confused about whether someone’s really into you? Look for these three signs: Verbal bullying, shaming and physical intimidation. As the Young Romance #193 (1973) gem “Miss Peeping Tom!” teaches us, cruelty is simply misguided passion. All it takes is a little nudge to get that man on the right track!

Tina, a lonely teen shutterbug, is bold enough to take photos of unsuspecting couples in broad daylight while they’re making out, but too timid to talk to boys. Her best friend, Wendy, tries to school her with sage observations about the opposite sex: “Any girl can cut (guys) down to half their size by making them bend over to kiss her! And the only way to do that is to get real close to them!” Continue reading

Podcast: ‘The Fifth Beatle’

I am a massive Beatles fan and relished the opportunity to geek out with Sidebar Nation’s Swain Hunt about Dark Horse’s “The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story” in a Sidebar podcast. This truly exquisite and poignant graphic novel tells the story of the Beatles’ manager, Brian Epstein, the man who played a central role in making them icons and struggled greatly in his personal life as a closeted gay man. Written by Vivek J. Tiwary and gloriously illustrated by lead artist Andrew C. Robinson (with notable contributions by Kyle Baker), it’s one of the best things I’ve read this year. We loved the hell out of it, so check us out as we discuss the many highlights.

CLICK HERE to listen to the podcast.

The Fifth Beatle

Missing Stair, Beware

Calling Out Shady Behavior in the Comics Industry

Perhaps you are familiar with a specific situation that’s been going on in the comics world, started by a string of tweets from creator Tess Fowler. It has been gaining momentum since a few weeks back, when Bleeding Cool published this article, chronicling a horrifying interaction Fowler had at SDCC one year with a high-profile creator, which continued even after the con ended.

She has continued speaking out about it, detailed here.

This trend of calling out creators and the industry as a whole for their bullshit was recently reinvigorated on Twitter by Brandon Graham, which propelled Fowler to share her experience. Continue reading

Five Reasons to Read … Red Sonja

Those of us who have been on Team Gail (as in Simone) for years were ready for her Red Sonja reboot with illustrator Walter Geovani as soon as it was announced. It will surprise very few people that this comic has met our high expectations in its first four issues. Let us count the ways in which this exciting, engaging book deserves your attention. Continue reading

V. reviews Pretty Deadly #1

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I had the privilege of reading the new Image series by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios, Pretty Deadly. Teased last year at Comic-Con, the anticipation and fanbase that has grown for a book that doesn’t see its first issue released until tomorrow is remarkable. The Pretty Deadly Tumblr is alive with fanart and cosplayers making plans to be Death’s daughter, Ginny, at their next con.

Continue reading