Saying Goodbye to Archie

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As a longtime Riverdale fan, I had all of the feelings when Archie Comics announced a certain iconic redhead’s death in Life With Archie #36, out last week. You can read my review in Newsarama (and Lindsey’s review of Squidder #1), but suffice it to say that it fell short in my opinion. I say that as someone who has thoroughly enjoyed the Life With Archie series overall and cares about the characters in that universe. Check it out, and if you’ve read this issue, I’d love to know what you thought.

On brighter note, my friend Craig had an amazing idea: “It’s the perfect opportunity to pitch my proposal for “Betty and Veronica: Riverdale’s Avenging Angels.”

You’re welcome, comics.

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One of the most memorable and well-done stories in recent history over at the DC of comics is Greg Rucka’s Detective Comics featuring Batwoman and his creation of the antagonist, Alice. When J.H. Williams was chosen to relaunch Batwoman on her own title, he made it clear that Alice would only be revisited with the utmost of care because he had so much respect for what he and Rucka had done previously. While he was on the book, Alice was revisited in his final arc, and I think he did a fine job. Continue reading

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Yesterday at the comic shop, I grabbed a peek at Deadly Class #1 because I knew it was Remender’s new book. As you know, I am a follow-the-writer kind of fangirl. A quick perusal of the pages struck me with some fantastic art.

Sold.

For more on Deadly Class #1, check Lindsey’s full review right HERE.

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Podcast: ‘The Fifth Beatle’

I am a massive Beatles fan and relished the opportunity to geek out with Sidebar Nation’s Swain Hunt about Dark Horse’s “The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story” in a Sidebar podcast. This truly exquisite and poignant graphic novel tells the story of the Beatles’ manager, Brian Epstein, the man who played a central role in making them icons and struggled greatly in his personal life as a closeted gay man. Written by Vivek J. Tiwary and gloriously illustrated by lead artist Andrew C. Robinson (with notable contributions by Kyle Baker), it’s one of the best things I’ve read this year. We loved the hell out of it, so check us out as we discuss the many highlights.

CLICK HERE to listen to the podcast.

The Fifth Beatle

V. reviews Pretty Deadly #1

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I had the privilege of reading the new Image series by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios, Pretty Deadly. Teased last year at Comic-Con, the anticipation and fanbase that has grown for a book that doesn’t see its first issue released until tomorrow is remarkable. The Pretty Deadly Tumblr is alive with fanart and cosplayers making plans to be Death’s daughter, Ginny, at their next con.

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Five Reasons to Read … Afterlife With Archie #1

Afterlife With Archie PanelMy Archie love has been well documented in the G3 space. However, I know there are plenty of comics readers who care as much about Riverdale as I do about zombies. Which is to say, not at all. But believe me, you don’t have to be a big fan of either to enjoy Afterlife With Archie #1, a new horror-themed series that knocked my socks off. “But E.,” you’re saying right now, “Give me one good reason to spend $2.99 on a comic about a bunch of goofy teenagers inhabiting a sanitized version of middle America.”

I’ll give you five.

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V. reviews Captain America #11

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Based on my glorious experience with Uncanny X-Force, I already knew Rick Remender was a good writer. While I have plenty of faith in his talent, I didn’t think he was so good that he could make a character like Captain America compelling.

I was wrong.

What do I mean by “a character like Captain America?” He’s as white-bread and straight-edge as it gets. While I don’t actively dislike the character, he certainly wasn’t interesting to me … until now. In just one issue, I like the guy. I may even come back around for another issue or two.

You can read my full review of Captain America #11 HERE.

V. reviews The Movement #4 & The Legend of Luther Strode #6

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Hey guys! I’m reviewing stuff again. This week is two quick reviews on Gail Simone’s slow-burn in The Movement #4 and the explosive final issue of The Legend of Luther Strode.

When The Strange Talents of Luther Strode hit the shelves last year, that book was pure energy and wildly addicting. I actually didn’t catch on to that trend until about issue five, read all of them … and squirmed until issue six came out. Justin Jordan and Tradd Moore’s Luther Strode is super intense, super violent and yet quite novel.

The Legend of Luther Strode is the second mini-series featuring Luther, Petra and a bevy of other misfits and I enjoyed it. But … I think this pony needs some new tricks because the novelty is wearing thin, even though the quality is still there. Word on the wind is we will be getting The Legacy of Luther Strode next year. I am still so going to read it, but I do hope these talented creators will bring a surprise or two.

That aside, Petra totally kicks ass in this issue. She massacres a couple of female fiction tropes which is one of my favorite things to read in the whole wide world. Not hyperbole.

Now, about The Movement. We here at the Church of Gail Simone give all available benefits of doubts and trust in her ability to weave a fine web of comic bookiness. I’ll admit, The Movement has been an acquired taste, but one that I think is well worth your time … and mine. When a writer references the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, it implies a thoughtfulness and a care for the injustices suffered by marginalized people. It’s culture in our comics … the all-to-often-ignored culture is the kind of stuff I like to read and support in our sea of escapism. I’ve still got some reservations about the art. I’d like Nicola Scott or Amanda Conner drawing these characters. Rags Morales would be a good fit, too. A fangirl can dream, right?

You can read my reviews HERE.

V. reviews Batman Inc finale, L. reviews Akaneiro & Adventure Time

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Seven years is a long time for a character’s story to last under one writer, but that is how long Grant Morrison has been building up to his final chapter for Batman. I have read his entire run including Final Crisis and 52, and his Batman is the only Batman I currently like. I know. I know. Some love Snyder’s Bat, and I hear Layman does a stand up job on ‘Tec.

The truth is, I don’t like Batman as a character. He doesn’t interest me. Continue reading

L. reviews The Invincible Haggard West, E. reviews Red Sonja

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Just in case you fine folks missed it, last week Lindsey reviewed Paul Pope’s one-shot, The Invincible Haggard West #101. She gave it very high marks. Being that Lindz is so cool and smart, this book probably is, too. You can check her review HERE.

Then, last Wednesday saw the release of Gail Simone’s much-anticipated Red Sonja from Dynamite Entertainment. Erika jumped at the chance to let the world know it’s just as good as we thought it would be. You can read that review HERE.

Red Sonja by Fiona Staples

G3 Review: Superman – Secret Identity

SuperboyIf Superman is the hero whose powers we all dream of having, many more of us can probably relate to Spider-Man. Underneath it all, he’s the regular joe whose powers weren’t a birthright but bestowed by accident. Rarely do his good deeds go unpunished, and he has wrestled with the question of how to do the right thing in a world where many don’t trust him. Continue reading