All Roads Lead to Shutter: An Interview with Joe Keatinge

Featured

Joe Keatinge’s star might still be rising, but his place in the industry was secured after the launch of his acclaimed run on Glory in 2012. Since then, books like Hell Yeah, DC Comics Presents, Morbius: The Living Vampire, and Marvel Knights: Hulk have (relative merits aside) served as stepping stones to Keatinge and artist Leila del Duca’s newest creator-owned series, Shutter.

Joe kindly took some time to chat with me about life, comics, and his new book. There was also some wine and a sandwich, which have been edited for your reading pleasure. Continue reading

Link

Yesterday at the comic shop, I grabbed a peek at Deadly Class #1 because I knew it was Remender’s new book. As you know, I am a follow-the-writer kind of fangirl. A quick perusal of the pages struck me with some fantastic art.

Sold.

For more on Deadly Class #1, check Lindsey’s full review right HERE.

deadly-class-01

 

V. reviews Pretty Deadly #1

Aside

I had the privilege of reading the new Image series by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios, Pretty Deadly. Teased last year at Comic-Con, the anticipation and fanbase that has grown for a book that doesn’t see its first issue released until tomorrow is remarkable. The Pretty Deadly Tumblr is alive with fanart and cosplayers making plans to be Death’s daughter, Ginny, at their next con.

Continue reading

5 Things to Love About RAT QUEENS

This week sees the release of Rat Queens by writers Kurtis Wiebe and Meg Dejmal and G3 favorite, artist Roc Upchurch. I had the distinct pleasure of reading the first issue, and I enjoyed it. Anything that can get a belly laugh out of me has my approval. Also, the art is pretty damn swank… a lovely segue into the first thing to love about Rat Queens. Continue reading

V. reviews The Movement #4 & The Legend of Luther Strode #6

Aside

Hey guys! I’m reviewing stuff again. This week is two quick reviews on Gail Simone’s slow-burn in The Movement #4 and the explosive final issue of The Legend of Luther Strode.

When The Strange Talents of Luther Strode hit the shelves last year, that book was pure energy and wildly addicting. I actually didn’t catch on to that trend until about issue five, read all of them … and squirmed until issue six came out. Justin Jordan and Tradd Moore’s Luther Strode is super intense, super violent and yet quite novel.

The Legend of Luther Strode is the second mini-series featuring Luther, Petra and a bevy of other misfits and I enjoyed it. But … I think this pony needs some new tricks because the novelty is wearing thin, even though the quality is still there. Word on the wind is we will be getting The Legacy of Luther Strode next year. I am still so going to read it, but I do hope these talented creators will bring a surprise or two.

That aside, Petra totally kicks ass in this issue. She massacres a couple of female fiction tropes which is one of my favorite things to read in the whole wide world. Not hyperbole.

Now, about The Movement. We here at the Church of Gail Simone give all available benefits of doubts and trust in her ability to weave a fine web of comic bookiness. I’ll admit, The Movement has been an acquired taste, but one that I think is well worth your time … and mine. When a writer references the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, it implies a thoughtfulness and a care for the injustices suffered by marginalized people. It’s culture in our comics … the all-to-often-ignored culture is the kind of stuff I like to read and support in our sea of escapism. I’ve still got some reservations about the art. I’d like Nicola Scott or Amanda Conner drawing these characters. Rags Morales would be a good fit, too. A fangirl can dream, right?

You can read my reviews HERE.

Gold, Guts and Grog: Introducing Rat Queens

One of the many announcements rolling out of C2E2 this weekend is the new project we teased here a couple of weeks ago by Peter Panzerfaust writer Kurtis Wiebe and artist Roc Upchurch. The title of the series is Rat Queens and it will be published by Image Comics’ Shadowline imprint.

Rat Queens will follow the exploits of four monster-hunting women whose love of partying is outweighed only by their love of exacting sweet, brutal revenge on their enemies.”

Sounds fun, right?

I have got a five-page preview below that says just that. But first, I had a chance to ask the writer, Kurtis Wiebe, a few questions. Continue reading

NRRD PROBZ – 11.06.2012

You guyyyyys I don’t want to have to talk about myself again NEXT week! Send those questions in! About whatever! lindsey@girls-gone-geek.com

“What is the worst/most offensive thing you have experienced working at the comic shop because of your gender? And on the flip side, have you ever had a wonderful experience at the comic shop … because of your gender?”

You know, I have this habit of suppressing bad memories, so the first part of your question is stumping me a bit. Also, I just don’t think that anything too terrible has happened. Pretty mild offenses to me, but I’m just an understanding person.

The stores I’ve worked at have had great clientele for the most part, it’s the casual customer that I usually have trouble with. Continue reading

Comic Judgment: Triple Play

Here’s the lowdown on the three best comics I read last week:

Punk Rock Jesus #4
I half expected Jesus to drop the mic and walk off the stage after that scalding final panel in Sean Murphy’s Punk Rock Jesus #4, which took the pull list prize last week. Batman #13 may have been the big draw, but PRJ is the one that really leaves a mark. Now a teen, Chris — the so-called clone of Jesus Christ — can only stand by and watch as the horrible J2 reality show franchise delivers his poor mother a final, crushing blow. Afterward, you can see in him the same dead-eyed grief that haunted his security guard, Thomas, an ex-IRA terrorist who witnessed horrible violence as a boy. Chris takes refuge in punk rock albums and extreme cardio, and he then fully rejects the dogma that has defined his existence. It’s goodbye, Bible; hello, Sex Pistols and Richard Dawkins. Let’s just say that Chris goes way off script and makes his feelings about religion and his followers scathingly clear in the most memorable scene of the week. Jesus has left the building. Grade: A+

Batman #13
The Joker has one of the scariest faces in comics, but he’s even more terrifying when you can’t really see him. In the first chapter of “Death of the Family,” we catch only glimpses of Batman’s nemesis as he makes a methodical, chilling comeback. A shoe here. A blood-splattered glove there. A cackle in the dark as victim after victim suffers off-camera. I doubt poor Jim Gordon will ever have a sound night’s sleep again after hearing the Joker’s startling commentary about where the commissioner stashes his cigarettes. This is a horror show in the making, and Snyder-Capullo deliver a perfectly paced, chilling first act. The “Tease” backup story, in which Mr. J. tests the depths of Harley Quinn’s loyalty, made my skin crawl right up until the last second. Grade: A

Halloween Eve (one-shot)
Image one-shot Halloween Eve is like candy. Its pleasures are brief, colorful and ultimately quite sweet. Brandon Montclare’s story focuses on the cranky Eve, a costume shop employee who loathes Halloween. When Eve falls asleep in the shop the night before Halloween, she plunges into a topsy-turvy fantasy world where every day is the one she hates most. Montclare’s story is charming, but it’s Amy Reeder’s art that dazzles. Reeder illustrated and colored the comic, and each panel is luminous and lovingly detailed. Her rendering of each character, especially the expressive Eve, is perfect. Plus, the magical aspects of the story give her a lot of room to play. Halloween Eve is a treat, one that’s appropriate and appealing for tween readers and up. Grade: B+

Nate Simpson on ‘Nonplayer’ and the art of creative perseverance

In the spring of 2011, “Nonplayer #1” (Image Comics) generated the kind of excitement that independent comics creators dream of. Written and illustrated by videogame concept artist Nate Simpson, the series introduced readers to Dana Stevens, a tamale delivery girl who escapes her mundane reality through the full-immersion online game “Warriors of Jarvath.” The praise for Simpson’s story and drop-dead gorgeous illustrations was immediate and plentiful, making it one of the most critically lauded comics of the year. By the summer, Warner Bros. had acquired the film rights. Simpson, a newcomer to comics, had a huge hit on his hands and a highly anticipated second issue to finish.

Then, that fall, Simpson crashed his bicycle — an incident that could have been fatal if he hadn’t been wearing a helmet. As the right-handed artist wrote on his Project Waldo blog, “Every bone connecting my right arm to my torso was broken.” His arm in a sling, he was physically sidelined. But Simpson began to write candidly about the other obstacles he had to confront, namely, the enormous pressure he felt after “Nonplayer #1” hit the shelves, and the moments of frustration and outright panic while writing the second issue. Continue reading

Comic Judgment: Mind the Gap #1

Mind the Gap #1
Written by Jim McCann
Art by Rodin Esquejo and Sonia Oback
Letters by Dave Lanphear

Image Comics is on fire. Week after week, it’s churning out some of the most interesting and innovative comic books around, and Mind the Gap #1 is no exception. On one level, it’s a tantalizing mystery about how a young woman named Elle Peterssen wound up gravely injured and comatose in a hospital bed. But there is an otherwordly aspect to the proceedings that makes Mind the Gap more than a well-written whodunit. Continue reading

G3 Review: Danger Club #1

Danger Club #1 (Image Comics)
Written by Landry Q. Walker
Art by Eric Jones and Michael “Rusty” Drake
Letters by Richard Starkings and Jimmy Betancourt

In comics, every teen hero reaches a point where he or she wants to prove capable of saving the world, or at least the day, without adult supervision. It’s a timeless theme that has fueled many excellent stories.

But what if the elders are completely out of the picture, maybe for good? What becomes of the sidekicks, to say nothing of the world, that they left behind? Continue reading

G3 Review: Alpha Girl #2

Alpha Girl #2
Written by Jeff Roenning and Jean-Paul Bonjour
Art by Robert Love, Dana Shukartsi and Diego Simone
Letters by Drew Gill

Imagine if Archie were a grindhouse film, The Walking Dead met Strange Girl, or Pee Wee from Porky’s rolled up an issue of Chew … and smoked it. These are the things I think of as I read Alpha Girl, but Alpha Girl #2 isn’t quite any of those things. With a zombie apocalypse on the horizon, this intentionally gratuitous tale of a 17-year-old girl tries really hard to be fun. Maybe too hard. Continue reading

Stream of Comicsness – Week of 03.21.2012

Greetings, lovelies. I had the distinct pleasure of being on vacation this week, so of course there were comics!

Snyder’s Detective
You can catch me almost anywhere complaining about how Batman is overrated and over exposed, so I tend to steer clear of most Batman books. Comixology had a stellar sale on Snyder’s Detective Comics, issues #871 thru #880. I bought them. I know, I am super late to the party, but wow. Snyder’s Detective is suspenseful and interesting. I love how Snyder shows that while Dick is a good Batman, he is no Bruce … and people notice the difference. Also, Snyder gave me a new appreciation for Commissioner Gordon. I think Jock’s art is great, but Francesco Francavilla is AMAZING. I know I am late to that party, too. It’s not that I am not familiar with Francavilla. I am. He has been killing it on cover art. But within the pages of Detective Comics, telling the story of Gordon’s son; he really strikes a superb aesthetic. This is good stuff people. You probably already knew that. Now I do, too.

My Stash This Week …
Wonder Woman #7, Birds of Prey #7, Fables #115, The Infinite Vacation #4, Strange Talent of Luther Strode #6 Continue reading

Just Go Buy Saga #1 Already

Saga #1
Written by Brian K. Vaughan
Art by Fiona Staples
Lettering/Design by Fonografiks
Published by Image Comics

An exceptional comic book leaves readers thinking not only about the story’s potential, but also the brilliance of what it has already delivered. Saga #1 is that kind of comic. From the beginning, it is obvious that writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Fiona Staples have created something special, and what a rare joy to read a highly anticipated book that delivers on every level. Continue reading

Stream of Comicsness – Week of 01.18.2012

Not So Wonderful
Holy crow. Who has been singing the praises of Wonder Woman louder than me? Since issue #1, I have been going on about Cliff Chiang’s beautiful art, and how Brian Azzarello “gets” Diana. Maybe I was just blinded by the light (art). I stand by what I said about Chiang being damn near perfect on this book, but this month’s issue was not drawn by Chiang. So, Azzarello had to do the heavy lifting with the story, and that just did not happen. There is plenty of Greek Mythology. There is another half-breed offspring of Zeus unexpectedly popping in on Diana, Poseidon shows up and Hera is still pissed off. Quelle suprise! Azzarello is a good writer, but this issue falls flat without Chiang’s magic. Tony Akins is the fill in artist, and either DC chose him because he kind of sort of draws like Chiang, or he tried to draw like Chiang. Either way, it was not working for me. It wasn’t bad, but I wasn’t impressed. Akins draws a pretty mean sea monster splash page, but his Diana is all wonky in the face. The proportions seemed off with the other characters as well. Cliff Chiang is a tough act to follow. Continue reading