Pull List Worthy Comics: January 27

pull list wor·thy

po͝ol list wərT͟Hē
adjective

1. a comic book that is deserving of effort, attention, respect and purchase.
“Since the first issue, The Wicked and The Divine has been consistently pull list worthy.”


It’s Wednesday you beautiful nerd-faced nerds! I am trying to do this pull-list thing weekly to make sure you all stay on track (and in-line) with appropriate comic book choices. And by appropriate, I mean awesome. Check it. Continue reading

Pull List Worthy Comics: January 20

pull list wor·thy

po͝ol list wərT͟Hē
adjective

1. a comic book that is deserving of effort, attention, respect and purchase.
“Bitch Planet is such a provocative read, it is totally pull list worthy.”


Happy Wednesday, nerds! I have cultivated a fine list of pull list worthy comics for you to check out when you hit your comic shop this week. In the mean time, tell me what’s on your pull list in the comments! Continue reading

REVIEW: Harley’s Little Black Book #1, Midnighter #7

I have a confession. I haven’t been reading much DC Comics… lately.

Yeah. I like Black Canary, but mostly because I am obsessed with the character and Annie Wu’s art. Bombshells is also a fine example of a superhero comic, and I do get my Secret Six on from time to time. That about sums it up.

I feel kind of blasphemous about it all. Birds of Prey. Wonder Woman. Superman: Birthright. These are the reasons I fell down the rabbit hole, and now I couldn’t give two shits. Much of the recent continuity, excluding Multiversity, rings wholly uninteresting to me. I will acknowledge that my aesthetic has certainly evolved since I began reading comics, and that is undeniably a part of my lackluster feelings towards DC. Also, who am I to judge when I am reading a whopping THREE titles?

So. Here’s me. Reading more DC. Trying to prove myself wrong.

Turns out. It worked.

Check my review of Harley’s Little Black Book #1 featuring Wonder Woman and drawn by Amanda Conner (YAY!). And I went ahead and reviewed Midnighter #7, too. Writer Steve Orlando has a particularly biting vernacular unlike any other, and Aco’s art is fanfreakingtastic. Check it.

REVIEW: DC Comics Bombshells #1

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Falling in love with the many gorgeous statues that are made of our cherished comic book characters can be an expensive endeavor. I was personally obsessed with the second Ame-Comi Wonder Woman designed by artist Dustin Nguyen. You know, the one that is an homage to Greg Rucka’s Wondy that decapitated Medusa blind? Yeah. I eventually got my hands on one, but at great cost to a former paramour as in he paid a pretty penny for it.

DC’s Bombshells statues are just as admirable, if not more. They’re fun, creative, cosplay worthy and inspire all kinds of ideas… you know, like for a comic book! Continue reading

REVIEW: Black Canary #2

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You guys! Annie Wu‘s pencils on Black Canary are SO GOOD! I’m basically obsessed, and over-the-moon that Wu is the one drawing my favorite character. I’d be remiss not to mention Lee Loughridge‘s colors. He does fantastic things for the tone of the book. The two of them combined SET the tone of the book. It’s edgy, but not trite. It’s modern and stylized. The art is basically the shit. I mean LOOK at my girl…

Also, check my full review of Black Canary #2 RIGHT HERE.

Link

Wonder Woman entered the Meredith and David Finch era last week with issue #36, and the good news is that it succeeds in bridging the previous run and the new without being off-putting for new readers. Those of us who were worried about Diana looking overly cheesecakey can breathe easy, as David Finch’s take on the character is respectful. Meredith Finch’s story is perfectly fine overall, and I’m glad to see Wonder Woman back at the center of her title. There is no real “wow” factor to the proceedings, though. That’s not a deal-breaker this early in the game, but I do hope there is more than standard fare on the horizon. Check out my full Newsarama review HERE.

JL splash Wonder Woman 36

Wonder Woman Is …

Enduring DC’s lackadaisical treatment of the first lady of comics has been something of a challenge for me critically, and if I am being completely honest, emotionally as well. When I get all fired up, I say things like, DC Ruined Wonder Woman Twice in One Day. Sure, it’s alarmist… only in the sense that I was genuinely alarmed. I pissed a few folks off with that write-up.

It is true that I rather enjoy raising the fanboy cackle, but I did read some of the criticisms of my rant. One thing stood out as fair – I had not read Superman/Wonder Woman. While I was only commenting on the strangeness and absurdity of a variant cover, I figure if I am going to continue to malign DC’s current treatment of the character – I could consider more than just Azzarello’s run. (Again, if I am being completely honest, two of my best good friends also told me I might like. It did take two of them.)

I have now read all seven issues of Superman/Wonder Woman, and I liked it. Mostly. Continue reading

DC Ruins Wonder Woman, Twice in One Day

The women of G3 stopped buying Wonder Woman months ago. But on occasion, I still read the issues in order to review them. Today, I read Wonder Woman #25 for that very reason (review forthcoming).

EDIT: Here’s that review.

***SPOILER WARNING***

The issue opens with Zola, Hera and Diana having coffee talk. In a flagrant “Fuck you!” to the Bechdel Test; first they compare notes about Hermes spying on them, then they expound upon how Apollo affected Hera and then Orion shows up to “save them” from Hermes’ watchful eye. The pixie-dream Strife punctuates the family gathering with an obvious attempt at subversion. Strife doing what Strife does, gives Diana a gift. It’s the helmet of the recently deceased Ares and we are presented with this gem of a panel … Continue reading

V. reviews The Movement #4 & The Legend of Luther Strode #6

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Hey guys! I’m reviewing stuff again. This week is two quick reviews on Gail Simone’s slow-burn in The Movement #4 and the explosive final issue of The Legend of Luther Strode.

When The Strange Talents of Luther Strode hit the shelves last year, that book was pure energy and wildly addicting. I actually didn’t catch on to that trend until about issue five, read all of them … and squirmed until issue six came out. Justin Jordan and Tradd Moore’s Luther Strode is super intense, super violent and yet quite novel.

The Legend of Luther Strode is the second mini-series featuring Luther, Petra and a bevy of other misfits and I enjoyed it. But … I think this pony needs some new tricks because the novelty is wearing thin, even though the quality is still there. Word on the wind is we will be getting The Legacy of Luther Strode next year. I am still so going to read it, but I do hope these talented creators will bring a surprise or two.

That aside, Petra totally kicks ass in this issue. She massacres a couple of female fiction tropes which is one of my favorite things to read in the whole wide world. Not hyperbole.

Now, about The Movement. We here at the Church of Gail Simone give all available benefits of doubts and trust in her ability to weave a fine web of comic bookiness. I’ll admit, The Movement has been an acquired taste, but one that I think is well worth your time … and mine. When a writer references the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, it implies a thoughtfulness and a care for the injustices suffered by marginalized people. It’s culture in our comics … the all-to-often-ignored culture is the kind of stuff I like to read and support in our sea of escapism. I’ve still got some reservations about the art. I’d like Nicola Scott or Amanda Conner drawing these characters. Rags Morales would be a good fit, too. A fangirl can dream, right?

You can read my reviews HERE.

G3 Interview: The Outhouse asks, ‘Has DC Done Something Stupid Today?’

Are you a longtime DC fan who’s been walking around under a cloud of angst, exhaustion and sadness lately? You’re not alone. It seems that every other week brings a fresh crop of commentary about the company’s WTF editorial decisions, rifts with creators, or questionable-to-terrible handling of characters. Scuttle a respected writer/artist team’s long-standing creative plans! Shoot Catwoman through the head just to make sure we’ve completely alienated the readers who were already disappointed by our treatment of prominent female characters! Give readers the impression that the new Superman/Wonder Woman book will be a sexytime romance comic with capes and lassos!

There’s a lot to keep track of, so the delightfully snarky and satirical site, The Outhouse, does all the work for you. In a masterful stroke of real-talk criticism, their crew launched a feature whose title says it all: Has DC Done Something Stupid Today? Continue reading

V. reviews The Movement #1

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The Movement #1I was so excited to read Gail Simone’s latest addition to the DC line-up, The Movement. I heard her say that it’s probably the most diversity in a DC comic … like ever. And not just racial diversity; The Movement will tout diverse perspectives, lifestyles, politics and beliefs. Hera knows the heteronormative world of mainstream comics needs some variation in perspective. I certainly have a strong desire for it in comics (and elsewhere).

The Movement #1 was not as strong of a first issue as I had hoped, but then I wonder if my expectations were unrealistically high. Were they high because I think Gail is a wonderful storyteller or because I want this book to beget more books like it thus prematurely placing it on a pedestal?  Or maybe … it just wasn’t a great first issue. Either way, you can read my full review here.

Have you read it? What do you think? Do you agree or disagree with my review?

E.’s Megacon Highlight Reel

If you’re ever suffering from a case of fan malaise, find the nearest comics/sci-fi/fantasy/anime convention and go. You won’t regret it.

As Megacon reminded me, there’s nothing quite like a con to reconnect a person with the joys of fandom. Spending a few days surrounded by happy people in costumes and talking to the creators who make Wednesdays special are two things that deserve spots on your bucket list.

Some highlights and observations: Continue reading

On Gail Simone’s Removal from Batgirl

No matter how you felt about Oracle and Stephanie Brown’s absence from DC’s 52, Barbara Gordon’s return as Batgirl was an undeniable success. A success for diversity.

Because Barbara being shot by the Joker in The Killing Joke remained in continuity, Barbara Gordon was healing from a traumatic injury. In returning her to the streets of Gotham, Gail gave us a clear picture of PTSD. We saw a female recover from one of the most violent assaults in DC history, and regain her power while showing vulnerability as a strength … a mechanism for the signature compassion of Barbara Gordon.

Gail Simone wrote her that way, and I doubt few (if any) other writers would have done the character such justice while showing grace under the pressure of launching a single-character title. Continue reading

NRRD PROBZ – 10.23.2012

This week, dear readers, it is I who has a problem. Mostly likely you have seen this in your DC comics from last week, but in case you haven’t, here is the gist. DC is running a College Humor ad in their issues which could be considered largely offensive to women and also just everyone! The humor website has five other “great villains of nerd culture,” all of which made me lose brain cells as I read their offenses against … I don’t know … well-adjusted, casual readers? Continue reading

BatWondy Nation Weeps

BatWondy fans everywhere — OK, maybe just me — were brokenhearted today when DC announced that Superman and Wonder Woman are officially an item. Justice League writer Geoff Johns described it as “the new status quo,” and Jim Lee’s cover for issue #12 suggests that Wondy keeps a toothbrush at the Fortress of Solitude.

I hate everything about this idea. Aside from being predictable and bland, it dashes any hope, at least for now, that Batman and Wonder Woman will rekindle the romance that stirred so many hearts just a few short years ago. Continue reading

The Not So New DCU

You may have read Erika’s review of Batman Incorporated #2, which is a stellar issue. Everything she said about it is true. Talia most certainly is a great character and Grant Morrison writes her well. But the issue stood out for me because it is full of DC continuity past. Somehow (we all know how), the rules of the relaunch don’t apply to Morrison.

And you know what?

Thank goodness for that.

While the relaunch boosted sales in the short term, and perhaps set up for DC’s attempt at a decent film franchise … almost one year later, I am not impressed with the DCnU. In fact, I am so not impressed that I am on the verge of barely having any DC books left on my pull list. Before, they made up the bulk of it.

Looking back, I was optimistic for B-list characters to get some love – Mr. Terrific, Voodoo, and Justice League Dark. All of which fell from my pull list within a few issues. I liked Blackhawks, but that got canned. I had slobbered all over every solicit for Batwoman, and was ecstatic that Wonder Woman would be drawn by Cliff Chiang. Now, both of those books, while beautiful and featuring characters I adore, are on the verge of being dropped. Continue reading

G3 Review: Wonder Woman #9

Gown NOT designed by Vera Wang.

G3 has had some issues with Wonder Woman lately. Not the character, but her title. V. summed it up very well in a heartfelt post about her frustration with the comic book’s direction in recent months.

I was OK with writer Brian Azzarello’s dark vision for the Amazons and his revamp of Wonder Woman’s origin, so this isn’t about being anti-change. However, after seeing Diana do something ridiculously gullible in issue #8 and slogging through a disappointing #9, I wonder what happened to the thrilling reboot that came leaping flawlessly out of the gate.

One problem is that the Greek gods have started to crowd Diana out of her own comic, making Wonder Woman more of an ensemble affair than a solo book with a strong central character. You might as well call it Wondy & the Gods. Continue reading

Thoughts on Azzarello’s Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman means a lot of things to a lot of people. She’s iconic and has permeated the collective consciousness in probably a million different ways depending on the person. So naturally, when Brian Azzarello comes along and changes every damn thing about her save her looks, it is most certainly going to make waves. In the instance of Wonder Woman #7 … he made tidal waves. I am definitely on Team Kelly when it comes to the horrific tradition the Amazons have apparently practiced for centuries, but that wasn’t enough for me to drop the book. Continue reading

Poll: Judging ‘Before Watchmen’

If all publicity is good publicity, the controversy-coated Before Watchmen project is golden. Any mention of these prequels to the classic 1986 Watchmen series by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons makes the comics Internet light up like Times Square. But as with all things Watchmen-related, this question is unavoidable: Has DC knowingly mistreated the creators? The beef between Moore and the company is legendary, and David Brothers of 4thletter has written some stellar essays about the whole ball of wax. They are must-reads. Continue reading

Stream of Comicsness – Week of 03.21.2012

Greetings, lovelies. I had the distinct pleasure of being on vacation this week, so of course there were comics!

Snyder’s Detective
You can catch me almost anywhere complaining about how Batman is overrated and over exposed, so I tend to steer clear of most Batman books. Comixology had a stellar sale on Snyder’s Detective Comics, issues #871 thru #880. I bought them. I know, I am super late to the party, but wow. Snyder’s Detective is suspenseful and interesting. I love how Snyder shows that while Dick is a good Batman, he is no Bruce … and people notice the difference. Also, Snyder gave me a new appreciation for Commissioner Gordon. I think Jock’s art is great, but Francesco Francavilla is AMAZING. I know I am late to that party, too. It’s not that I am not familiar with Francavilla. I am. He has been killing it on cover art. But within the pages of Detective Comics, telling the story of Gordon’s son; he really strikes a superb aesthetic. This is good stuff people. You probably already knew that. Now I do, too.

My Stash This Week …
Wonder Woman #7, Birds of Prey #7, Fables #115, The Infinite Vacation #4, Strange Talent of Luther Strode #6 Continue reading