REVIEW: DC Comics Bombshells #1

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Falling in love with the many gorgeous statues that are made of our cherished comic book characters can be an expensive endeavor. I was personally obsessed with the second Ame-Comi Wonder Woman designed by artist Dustin Nguyen. You know, the one that is an homage to Greg Rucka’s Wondy that decapitated Medusa blind? Yeah. I eventually got my hands on one, but at great cost to a former paramour as in he paid a pretty penny for it.

DC’s Bombshells statues are just as admirable, if not more. They’re fun, creative, cosplay worthy and inspire all kinds of ideas… you know, like for a comic book! Continue reading

REVIEW: Fables #150

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Fables was one of the comics I cut my teeth on, and it will always hold a special place on my shelf. Today, the final (mega) issue of Fables hits comic shops, and the unconventional, intricate, addictive fairy tale is over. Bill Willingham, Mark Buckingham, Steve Leialoha and all the other wonderful artists and editors totally stuck the landing.

You can read my full review HERE.

Fables Farewell

REVIEW: Black Canary #2

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You guys! Annie Wu‘s pencils on Black Canary are SO GOOD! I’m basically obsessed, and over-the-moon that Wu is the one drawing my favorite character. I’d be remiss not to mention Lee Loughridge‘s colors. He does fantastic things for the tone of the book. The two of them combined SET the tone of the book. It’s edgy, but not trite. It’s modern and stylized. The art is basically the shit. I mean LOOK at my girl…

Also, check my full review of Black Canary #2 RIGHT HERE.

REVIEW: Spider-Gwen #1

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Having rattled many a figurative comics cage in my blogging time in attempts to get publishers to take notice (and they didn’t), it is beyond gratifying to see Spider-Gwen #1 come to print. Last September, a spidey-powered Gwen Stacy graced the pages of Edge of the Spider-Verse #2 as just an alternate-world character, but the fan response was so overwhelmingly positive that Marvel gave Gwen her own book.

What does that mean? Continue reading

REVIEW: Miami Vice Remix #1

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Buddy cop comics really aren’t my thing unless it’s Birds of Prey, and they’re not really cops. Although, I’d totally ready a book that paired up Renee Montoya with Starling. That’d be fun. I digress.

Miami Vice had the ultimate buddy cops. Tubbs and Crockett set trends that have reverberated through the film and television generations. Now, there is a comic. One that I think is totally worth your time, particularly if you were ever a fan of the show. This version has some modern pop culture mixed in and Jim Mahfood’s extravagant art. “Remix” is a perfect moniker.

You can read my full review HERE.

miami2

REVIEW: Casanova Acedia #1

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As a brief introduction, Casanova #8 was one of the first comics I picked up when I started working at a comic shop in 2008. I had no idea what it was – it might have been a FCBD promo – and the title led me to believe that it would revolve around a dude boning a lot of ladies or something. Not really my wheelhouse, but the cover drew me in immediately. Continue reading

REVIEW: Lady Killer #1

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Dark Horse Comics kicks off the year with an excellent new comic called Lady Killer by Joëlle Jones, Jamie S. Rich and Laura Allred. I’ve actually been a fan of Joëlle’s style for quite some time now, and you may have seen her selling some of her prints at a con near you. Anyway, her talent is thoroughly showcased in this book. The art is fantastic, you guys. And Laura Allred’s colors are to die for (pun intended). Continue reading

REVIEW: Punk Mambo #0

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I love it when a new character comes along and lights my fire. Punk Mambo would be just such a character. Born in the pages of Shadowman, she is Peter Milligan’s baby. She’s definitely got spit and fire. She’s also got a cavalcade of dark magic that could totally melt your face. The best part about her is that she marches to the beat of her own strange drum. I reviewed the one-shot out tomorrow by Valiant, and this would qualify as a great girl story. You can read my full review HERE.

And in case you missed it, I reviewed the final issue of Azzarello and Chiang’s Wonder Woman a couple of weeks ago. You will not be at all surprised to know that I got a little saucy with it. While you’re there, check Lindsey’s review of Elektra, too.

You guys, Robert Gill's art is baller!

You guys, Robert Gill’s art is baller!

V. reviews Pretty Deadly #1

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I had the privilege of reading the new Image series by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios, Pretty Deadly. Teased last year at Comic-Con, the anticipation and fanbase that has grown for a book that doesn’t see its first issue released until tomorrow is remarkable. The Pretty Deadly Tumblr is alive with fanart and cosplayers making plans to be Death’s daughter, Ginny, at their next con.

Continue reading

V. reviews Captain America #11

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Based on my glorious experience with Uncanny X-Force, I already knew Rick Remender was a good writer. While I have plenty of faith in his talent, I didn’t think he was so good that he could make a character like Captain America compelling.

I was wrong.

What do I mean by “a character like Captain America?” He’s as white-bread and straight-edge as it gets. While I don’t actively dislike the character, he certainly wasn’t interesting to me … until now. In just one issue, I like the guy. I may even come back around for another issue or two.

You can read my full review of Captain America #11 HERE.

V. reviews The Movement #4 & The Legend of Luther Strode #6

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Hey guys! I’m reviewing stuff again. This week is two quick reviews on Gail Simone’s slow-burn in The Movement #4 and the explosive final issue of The Legend of Luther Strode.

When The Strange Talents of Luther Strode hit the shelves last year, that book was pure energy and wildly addicting. I actually didn’t catch on to that trend until about issue five, read all of them … and squirmed until issue six came out. Justin Jordan and Tradd Moore’s Luther Strode is super intense, super violent and yet quite novel.

The Legend of Luther Strode is the second mini-series featuring Luther, Petra and a bevy of other misfits and I enjoyed it. But … I think this pony needs some new tricks because the novelty is wearing thin, even though the quality is still there. Word on the wind is we will be getting The Legacy of Luther Strode next year. I am still so going to read it, but I do hope these talented creators will bring a surprise or two.

That aside, Petra totally kicks ass in this issue. She massacres a couple of female fiction tropes which is one of my favorite things to read in the whole wide world. Not hyperbole.

Now, about The Movement. We here at the Church of Gail Simone give all available benefits of doubts and trust in her ability to weave a fine web of comic bookiness. I’ll admit, The Movement has been an acquired taste, but one that I think is well worth your time … and mine. When a writer references the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, it implies a thoughtfulness and a care for the injustices suffered by marginalized people. It’s culture in our comics … the all-to-often-ignored culture is the kind of stuff I like to read and support in our sea of escapism. I’ve still got some reservations about the art. I’d like Nicola Scott or Amanda Conner drawing these characters. Rags Morales would be a good fit, too. A fangirl can dream, right?

You can read my reviews HERE.

V. reviews Batman Inc finale, L. reviews Akaneiro & Adventure Time

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Seven years is a long time for a character’s story to last under one writer, but that is how long Grant Morrison has been building up to his final chapter for Batman. I have read his entire run including Final Crisis and 52, and his Batman is the only Batman I currently like. I know. I know. Some love Snyder’s Bat, and I hear Layman does a stand up job on ‘Tec.

The truth is, I don’t like Batman as a character. He doesn’t interest me. Continue reading

Geek Girls Have “Nothing To Prove”

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Perusing Twitter is a bedtime ritual of mine and a general side-effect of smartphone addiction. But tonight I happened across something that made me get out of bed and blog. Our darling Gail tweeted this:

Therefore, I had the pleasure of watching this:

I may or may not have welled-up just a bit while watching that. Continue reading

L. reviews The Invincible Haggard West, E. reviews Red Sonja

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Just in case you fine folks missed it, last week Lindsey reviewed Paul Pope’s one-shot, The Invincible Haggard West #101. She gave it very high marks. Being that Lindz is so cool and smart, this book probably is, too. You can check her review HERE.

Then, last Wednesday saw the release of Gail Simone’s much-anticipated Red Sonja from Dynamite Entertainment. Erika jumped at the chance to let the world know it’s just as good as we thought it would be. You can read that review HERE.

Red Sonja by Fiona Staples

V. reviews Wonder Woman #20 and Fatale #14

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Wonder Woman has been on my pull list for seven years straight. After reading Wonder Woman #20, I dropped it.

I don’t mention it in my review, but Diana was in only 8 of the 20 pages in this issue and she didn’t even make an appearance until page 5. When she does appear, her thunder is stolen almost as quickly as it appears.

I swear Brian Azzarello is mocking Wonder Woman fans.

I imagine him reading the bad reviews and angry tweets while stroking his beard and laughing maniacally. “You wanna talk shit about  me, eh? Watch what I do to your beloved princess.”

The thing is … Azzarello has done very little with the character apart from having her slapped on the assRucka’s Wonder Woman would have never been slapped on the ass.

My character loyalty has continued the support of this book for about a year too long. I refuse to endure another month of disappointment especially when there are many other female-led comics that are better.

Fatale is one of them. I reviewed that too.

V. reviews The Movement #1

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The Movement #1I was so excited to read Gail Simone’s latest addition to the DC line-up, The Movement. I heard her say that it’s probably the most diversity in a DC comic … like ever. And not just racial diversity; The Movement will tout diverse perspectives, lifestyles, politics and beliefs. Hera knows the heteronormative world of mainstream comics needs some variation in perspective. I certainly have a strong desire for it in comics (and elsewhere).

The Movement #1 was not as strong of a first issue as I had hoped, but then I wonder if my expectations were unrealistically high. Were they high because I think Gail is a wonderful storyteller or because I want this book to beget more books like it thus prematurely placing it on a pedestal?  Or maybe … it just wasn’t a great first issue. Either way, you can read my full review here.

Have you read it? What do you think? Do you agree or disagree with my review?

Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines on PBS

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I love a good documentary, but none more than Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines. Last year, Erika and I had the distinct pleasure of viewing this film (and reviewing it), and it moved me beyond words. It says so many of the things I want to say here at this blog about women and comics. For this fangirl, it’s an intelligent, poignant and supremely validating look at the female superheroine and her role in shaping the American woman. It is a must see film for ALL comic book fans. Beyond comic fandom, it will enlighten the friends and families of comic lovers of the power of comics in culture.

WONDER WOMEN! THE UNTOLD STORY OF AMERICAN SUPERHEROINES will have its television broadcast premiere in the United States on PBS’s Independent Lens series on Monday, April 15, 2013. Check your local listings to confirm the time and date.

Sneak Peek: New Project by Kurtis Wiebe & Roc Upchurch

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One of our first interviews here at G3 was with super-fresh artist John ‘Roc’ Upchurch. He was the talent behind my darling avatar. Since then, I have followed Roc’s art career because I think he’s great and deserves to be noticed. I was beyond excited when writer Kurtis Wiebe (Peter Panzerfaust, Green Wake, Grim Leaper) teased a new project that Roc will be drawing. I am quite looking forward to it.

While the official announcement hasn’t been made yet – you can catch the first two teasers here and here. I’ve got the third one below.

Meet Betty … Continue reading

Gail Simone on Writing Female Characters

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Because diversity of female characters has been lacking in comics, film and just fiction in general, coupled with an upsurgence of feminism; there seems to be this perception that IF you choose to portray a female character, then she HAS to be a positive role model. I think that is absurd, unrealistic, and stifling of creativity.

Today, Gail Simone posted a respone to an anonymous question on her Tumblr addressing this very thing, and her response is highly rebloggable:

No one is ever asking for all females to be perfect avatars of all good things. Most sensible people are looking for a SPECTRUM of qualities for female (and other gender specifications) characters.

We want bad girls and good women and selfish ladies and caring mothers and terrible daughters and nasty wives and sacrificing girlfriends, we want villains and heroes and supporting cast members.

There’s no ‘wrong’ female character or scenario, it’s all purely in the execution.

Yes. It’s in the execution.

Write any kind of character that you like, that fits the story, that is creative and honest. Write every kind of female. Write lots of female characters. Then maybe we will get to a point where there is something for everyone, and she won’t have to be everything to everyone.